Photograph of Taughannock Falls in Tompkins County, New York.

Here on Earth

The place where you are right now has a rich geological history that is recorded by the rocks beneath you and the fossils that they may contain. The rocks and fossils reveal the movements of continents and the evolution of new forms of life. This history helps to explain why the Earth looks like it does today. It also explains things like the distributions of natural resources, from rare minerals to rich soils for agriculture. Studying Earth's ancient climate also helps us to make sense of how the climate is changing today and how it will affect us where we live.

The goal of this part of the [email protected] project is to explain the Earth science of every region of the United States. We are beginning with coverage of the southeastern and northeastern United States. More regions will be added regularly, so please check back soon.

Introductions to Earth Science Topics

Quick overviews of the topics that are explored in greater detail in each individual region of the United States.


Rocks

Overview of the three major groups of rocks (sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic), examples of each, and introduction to the rock cycle.


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Photograph of rocks in Hawaii, including pieces of black basalt and white limestone made by corals.

Climate

Introduction to climate, including what climate is, past climate, present climate of the United States, and future climate.


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Photograph of a lake in northern Wisconsin.

Earth hazards


Introduction to major types of Earth hazards, including natural disasters like earthquakes, tornados, and floods.


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Photograph showing damage resulting from the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906.

Energy


Introduction to energy, including definition of energy, fossil fuel types and their extraction, renewable energy, and the future of energy.

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An aerial photograph of energy production infrastructure in the Williston Basin, Montana

Resources


Lists of supplemental and teaching resources for the Earth sciences, sorted by topic.


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Southeastern United States

The southeastern United States includes West Virginia, Kentucky, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and Florida. Major regions include the Inland Basin, Blue Ridge and Piedmont, and Coastal Plain.


Map showing the states of the northeastern U.S.

Overviews of Southeastern U.S. Earth Science


Main Page
Geologic History
Climate
Earth Hazards

Inland Basin Region

West Virginia, most of Kentucky and Tennessee, western Virginia, northwestern Georgia, and northern Alabama.


Rocks
Fossils
Topography
Energy

Blue Ridge and Piedmont Region

Central Virginia, western North Carolina, western South Carolina, northern Georgia, east-central Alabama.


Rocks
Fossils
Topography
Energy

Coastal Plain Region

Eastern Virginia, eastern North Carolina, eastern South Carolina, southern Georgia, Florida, southern Alabama, Mississippi, western Tennessee, far western Kentucky.


Rocks
Fossils
Topography
Energy

Northeastern United States

The northeastern United States include Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland.

Pages online now describe the geologic history of the northeastern United States, as well as the rocks of the Inland Basin region.


Main Page
Map showing the states of the northeastern U.S.